“Aunt Frances, 102”

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I have not seen “Aunt” Frances since she moved and my Tuesdays that had been with her are now my weekly day off(well, most weeks anyway).  I do know from my neighbor(her niece) that she has adapted well…likes the fact that she no longer has to worry about things going wrong with her home, shopping for food and wondering how she was getting to her various appointments.

Dear “Aunt Frances” will be celebrating her 102 birthday on Tuesday and our local tv station filmed her playing her organ at her church last week…which she still does every Sunday.  http://wnep.com/2016/02/10/101-year-old-piano-player-still-going-strong/

What enables a person to live a long life and still be able to do as “Aunt Frances” can do?  I know she hasn’t had an “easy” life by any standards.  She and her siblings were placed in a children’s home when their mother passed away and their father couldn’t take care of them.  The girls were in one building and the boys were in another.  She married fairly young and her husband was a miner and farmer.  They had three children and at a young age, her husband died from Miners lung…leaving her and three children still in school.  At this point she worked in a clothing factory…eventually becoming supervisor and making the samples.  All this while still maintaining the farm.

She drove her car well into her 90s and it was only when the last car couldn’t be repaired that she and her children decided maybe it was time to stop driving.  She sang in a community chorus until she was 100.

I feel longevity is governed in part by our genetics, by how we’ve taken care of ourselves, our belief system. our positive outlook on life, gratitude,  and our interest in life.  “Aunt Frances” is never bored…her active role in her music, reading, sewing, crocheting, counted cross stitch, keeping track of her family and now her activities in the retirement village in which she lives.

Wishing you a lovely birthday “Aunt Frances”!

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2 thoughts on ““Aunt Frances, 102”

  1. WOW — Totally agree, and many happy returns to Aunt Frances!
    The matriarchs in the mountains of New Mexico lived like this, and most often were still planting their gardens, weaving on their looms, and taking care of the great-grand-children right up until they were gone at 104 or whenever. They just lived every day to the fullest and kept on going…

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